Meadow rue, the Thalictrum species

This is:

A potpourri (below) of meadow rue/Thalictrum species information as a supplement to other articles.

A plant-based page rather than our usual topic-based page. It's a pivot point, one list of links to ours and others' articles that involve meadow rue/Thalictrum species.

We're just introducing this set of perennial info pages. This page is in process but Aster's page is complete. We hope you'll take a look there and comment. Let us know if the format was useful, share your suggestions, tell us we shouldn't have this page at all... anything helps.

A meadow rue's individual flowers are tiny but the overall mass is powerful. The plants are dioecious, meaning a given plant sports only male (pollen producing) or female (seed producing) flowers. Since the stamens (male parts) are the showiest feature of a Thalictrum blossom and since the pollen is windborne, meadow rues that are most attractive may also be the most trouble for hay fever sufferers.

A meadow rue's individual flowers are tiny but the overall mass is powerful. The plants are dioecious, meaning a given plant sports only male (pollen producing) or female (seed producing) flowers. Since the stamens (male parts) are the showiest feature of a Thalictrum blossom and since the pollen is windborne, meadow rues that are most attractive may also be the most trouble for hay fever sufferers.

Above: Lavender mist meadow rue (Thalictrum rochebrunianum) is a late blooming, very tall species with flowers to match its name.
Right: One of our first meadow rue experiences was with this tall, continent-wide native called purple meadow rue (T. dasycarpum, named not for its bloom but for the stem color). We brought a plant home from a moist place on Great Uncle Axel's property, an act that elicited good natured sneers from Great Uncle Eldon about digging up "weeds." Eldon's assessment was also accurate -- the plant's persisted in our mostly-wild garden for decades by popping up where it will.

Most Thalictrum plants are happiest in cool, moist situations and some want to be in an open wooded spot, so look for a place with mid-afternoon shade that fends off the hottest sun.

Other meadow rues we love:
Thalictrum glaucum
, (a.k.a. T. speciossisimum) with yellow flowers in late spring and gorgeous blue green foliage. 4'

Thalictrum minus, a smaller version of purple meadow rue, 18" tall, with delicate lacy foliage.

Read more about meadow rue (Thalictrum):