Stickers prickers glue gone

When we first met and began gardening together, we relied as our parents had on tweezers, flame-sterilized needles and true grit to remove thorns from our thumbs and prickers from our palms. Torture! Thank goodness a gardener showed us another way. Now juniper needles, barberry barbs, cactus prickles and splinters from wooden tool handles all come out quickly and painlessly. So well does it work that the grandkids come asking for the glue gone method.

This irritating item was in her foot but the process is the same as for hands. She graciously allowed us to photograph the operation:

Locate the splinter or barb.

Locate the splinter or barb.

Apply Elmer's Glue-All. Not wood glue, not rubber cement. We haven't tried others - Elmer is dependable!

Apply Elmer's Glue-All. Not wood glue, not rubber cement. We haven't tried others - Elmer is dependable!

Smear on a relatively thick layer. Cover at least a square inch.

Smear on a relatively thick layer. Cover at least a square inch.

Wait for the glue to dry. This is the hardest part for Janet. But she so loves the next step that “If I’m going to wait for glue to dry, let’s make it a really big schmear, for the fun of peeling it off!”

When the glue is no longer white, peel it off. Et voila…

When the glue is no longer white, peel it off. Et voila…

…there’s the grit that was embedded in the 8 year old’s toe.

…there’s the grit that was embedded in the 8 year old’s toe.

Sometimes it fails. We had to resort to tweezers and a needle recently to remove a long splinter  deep in Steven’s finger. While Steven winced and bit his tongue, Janet talked about our biggest intact peel-off. (A complete palm).

 

Give it a try next time you find one of those annoying items stuck in your skin. It’ll pull your thorns and also whisk you back to elementary school days.

We wish we could give credit and proper Mentor status to the woman who clued us to glue but ironically, her name never stuck. Janet met her in her first career as a telephone installer, that job she held and enjoyed despite being warned regularly, “Macunovich, no other truck is so dirty inside as yours! What are you doing in there?!” A great job that took her into many homes and back yards, and introduced her to many gardeners, generous folks who loved to tip the Telephone Lady with plants.

One more word of advice. If you wear gloves, as we do, and you have just pulled out some stickers, do not put the same gloves on again. How many times have we done that, failing to remember that the glove has stickers in it, too!